• TOP>
  • Cambodia

Cambodia

Delivering Medical Peace of Mind to the Locals

ASIA Alliance Medical Center

P6-2.jpg

We started our activities in Cambodia in 2008, by traveling to local medical facilities to provide free medical services. However, this approach had some downsides: Inability to provide medical care in emergencies when it is most needed, inability to provide sufficient services to those who require periodic medical treatment due to lack of any fixed facilities, and inability to develop and foster medical professionals continuously and consistently. To overcome these, Japan Heart has built its own clinic as its base to provide healthcare services to local people and to support more and more local talents as future healthcare professionals in Cambodia. Since its opening in 2005, the clinic, ASIA Alliance Medical Center ("ジャパンハート医療センター" in Japanese), has worked with local government-owned clinics in neighboring areas to accept patients, including many deprived children and expecting mothers, on daily basis. Here, we will go beyond Cambodia and extend our free healthcare services to cover the whole area by welcoming both patients and healthcare professionals from adjacent countries.

“Kadey Sromay Pit” Project: (“True Dream” Project)

Creating a bridge for Cambodian youth to reach their dreams

"I want to become a doctor to help my village people, but I can't afford it." When aspiring students are in need, we can make their dreams come true. Why don't you join us ?

Cambodia today

Most of Cambodia's medical professionals perished during the Pol Pot regime. The new government, responding to this crisis, hastily issued diplomas to medical students who had finished a one year course to produce as many doctors as possible. Although the current system requires medical students to complete an 8 year program and student nurses a 4 year program, still there is lingering distrust of less educated and less experienced medical professionals among Cambodian people.

Dreams of Cambodian youth

"When I bring patients to a hospital in a small village I live, doctors refuse to see them unless they have enough money. Poor patients are left on beds untreated. Some pharmacies sell medication without prescriptions: some medication works if they have luck whereas others don't if they have no luck. Nonetheless, patients just keep taking the medication, because they have no other choice. Doctors and nurses tend to help patients only when they are friends, relatives or wealthy people. Some stores sell medication in the corner next to regular products, although they have no medical knowledge. I pondered over and over what I could do to save the people in my village. Then I made up my mind. I will study hard and become a good doctor with sufficient medical knowledge to help people." (Cited from "Why I decided to become a doctor" by Seng Rathna, 2012 scholarship student)
Distrust of the medical profession is not easily alleviated, but on the other hand, there are young people who have a strong desire to better the profession. In 2011, driven by their vision, Japan Heart launched a new project, "Kady Sromay Pit" Project ("True Dream" Project) in Cambodia.

Training medical students

Medical scholarship students participate in surgical missions at medical facilities and travel to villages to care for patients with Japan Heart's staff, learning what should come first in health care.
Students are encouraged to approach patients and come up with new ideas themselves. Japan Heart's goal is to train these medical students to become professionals who can provide compassionate and patient-oriented health care for the people in Cambodia.

Become a Sponsor Today!

Scholarship Recipients

High school students aspiring to become doctors or nurses, with poor economical situation of their family.

Monthly Sponsorship Options

1.Sponsor one Medical Student 18,000 yen/month pays tuition (about 14,000 yen), meals & utilities (about 4,000 yen)
2.Sponsor one Student Nurse 11,000 yen/month pays tuition (about 7,000 yen), meals & utilities (about 4,000 yen)

Sponsorship can be by individuals or groups.

Monthly Sponsorship Terms

Medical Student 10 years (8 years at school and 2 years for internship)
Student Nurse 6 years (4 years at school and 2 years for internship)

Students are sponsored until they pass the national examinations and complete 2 year internships.
(The students will be trained by Japan Heart staff to build clinical experience.)

Note: Sponsorship can be terminated or suspended by notifying the office of Japan Heart.

Sponsors can

  1. Meet the students you support and spend time with them in Cambodia.
  2. Receive reports from the students with photos and be informed of their activities.
  3. Correspond with students. Japan Heart will help with translation.

Training local health care professionals

In March 2008, Japan Heart expanded its area of operation to include Cambodia, dispatching only nurses to start up the project. Two years later, their effort resulted in implementing hygiene and health care services in this country where many problems existed. Japan Heart is currently training local Cambodian doctors and nurses at Cheung Prey Hospital in the province of Kampong Cham, 70 km from Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia. Lectures and clinical practice are provided to improve their medical techniques.
Previously, patients of all ages crossed provincial lines to seek care from this public hospital, but due to the lack of surgical capability, many had to be transferred to hospitals in Phnom Penh, two hours away. Recognizing this hardship, officials in the Cambodian Ministry of Health resolved: "This hospital must be capable of providing surgery to people who need it."
When Japan Heart arrived there, the devastation wreaked by the Pol Pot regime was still visible throughout the country. Among other problems, access to healthcare and education was critically damaged. Japan Heart studied this tragic history and conducted a series of on-site surveys, concluding that training local medical personnel was vital and urgent.

Subsequently, at the request of the Cambodian Ministry of Health, Japan Heart assisted with the rebirth of Cheung Prei Hospital, transforming it into a facility where surgery is readily available for all patients. To make this happen, the medical staff needed advanced training and the structure, equipment and supplies had to be significantly upgraded. Financed by Japan Heart, Cheung Prey Hospital started undergoing renovations in 2010. While the hospital was being transformed, Japan Heart doctors and nurses provided a series of training program to the hospital's medical staff, who had little experience with surgery.

In January 2012, when the renovations were nearly completed, Japan Heart staffed a full time medical team there for three months to join local doctors and nurses in practicing surgical procedures. While the primary goal is to support and train the Cambodian medical staff, Japan Heart is hoping that local doctors and nurses will take their newly acquired surgical skills and adapt them to local needs to better serve their own people without help from outside experts. Such an evolution would be the realization of Japan Heart's true hopes.

 


Donate NowDonate Now